7 Comments
Feb 19Liked by Michael Easter

I always struggle with recovery because I think I can “gut out” a bad day. Using some metric such as HRV helps quantitatively. BTW it took me a while to figure out the app that uses the iPhone camera (and I am sure there is more than one). I found the app developed by Dr. Altini called HRV4Training which is $9.99 on the Apple App Store. I am going to give it a try…thanks for another good article!

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Feb 19Liked by Michael Easter

My FitBit is absolutely terrible about predicting my recovery. I work based on feeling, ignoring the readyness score, but I'm going to try the HRV app out of interest and see how it compares.

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As usual you write a post on something I’m thinking about. I am getting over RSV. In the past year+ I’ve taken rest days but nothing extended. I took last week off with no guilt. Did some yoga yesterday, a tough body weight workout tonight and going to try to get in a really short ruck around the block. I listened to my body saying “time to shut it down”.

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Great stuff. This is what I’ve learned about recovery: can’t do two-a-days anymore. I can do consecutive full-body KB sessions but no more than

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I use my Garmin Fenix extensively to assess recovery. As noted in the post, heart rate and HRV are key indicators that I use. Stress is a “made-up” metric that incorporates both heart rate and HRV. Over the years, I’ve found that combining both subjective and objective measures works best. For example, my stress levels are higher when I travel even though I don’t feel stress consciously. Ever since my injury earlier in January, my stress levels have been above average until just recently. I interpret this to mean that my body is recovering (consistent with my subjective experience). So, I think an important facet here is baseline. If you use these wearables over a long time, they are good at capturing anomalies and trends that can usefully inform your decisions.

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